CICERO - Center for International Climate Research
NO
Meny
TOPICS

CICERO is studying greenhouse gas emissions from the food and land-use systems

As part of the project NorthWesternPaths, CICERO researchers are studying how changes in diet, food waste, agriculture and forestry could help reduce Norway’s greenhouse gas emissions.

GRACE - Technical documentation

The model for Global Responses to Anthropogenic Change in the Environment (GRACE) is a multi-sector, multi-regional, recursively dynamic global computable general equilibrium model (CGE) written in GAMS and based on GTAP database. The initial version of the model was developed at CICERO by Aaheim and Rive (2005) for long-term economic analysis of climate change impacts and greenhouse gas abatement policy. It was designed to allow for additional modules for analysis, including emissions permit trading and climate impacts on economic sectors. Coupled with an atmospheric model, the model can also be used for integrated assessment modelling of the climate and economy. Since then several versions have been developed by updating data and certain modules for various studies. Go back to the general introduction.

ClimINVEST presentation series: Physical climate change for finance

This presentation series aimed at providing guidance for the financial sector dives into climate hazards and case studies on physical climate risk.

IPCC report shows global warming threatens global food security

The latest report by the UN climate panel concludes that unless we cut emissions in all sectors now, the result will be irreparable loss of land-based ecosystem functions and services, and this could put global food security at risk.

Not All Grass is Green

Is our appetite for meat part of the climate problem? Can it be the solution? A study sheds new light on the old discussion about pastorals and sustainability.

Agricultural emissions in Norway

In Norway, agricultural emissions are generally regarded to contribute about 8% of total emissions. How has this changed over time? And where do those emissions come from?