CICERO - Center for International Climate Research
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Climate policies must intensify to accelerate emission reductions in the post-COVID era

Global CO2 emissions declined sharply in 2020, but with a rebound expected in 2021 efforts must be intensified if the world is to reach the targets of the Paris Climate Agreement and keep global warming well below 2°C, a new study shows.

INDGREEN: India’s ambitions and possibilities of becoming a global green leader

In the research project INDGREEN, CICERO will contribute to understanding the relationship between India’s handling of its low-carbon domestic development and its role in international climate negotiations.

Rising use of nitrogen fertilisers could jeopardise global climate goals

The growing use of nitrogen fertilisers in world food production could put ambitious climate targets out of reach, as it leads to rising levels of nitrous oxide (N2O) in the atmosphere, a new study shows.

GRACE - Technical documentation

The model for Global Responses to Anthropogenic Change in the Environment (GRACE) is a multi-sector, multi-regional, recursively dynamic global computable general equilibrium model (CGE) written in GAMS and based on GTAP database. The initial version of the model was developed at CICERO by Aaheim and Rive (2005) for long-term economic analysis of climate change impacts and greenhouse gas abatement policy. It was designed to allow for additional modules for analysis, including emissions permit trading and climate impacts on economic sectors. Coupled with an atmospheric model, the model can also be used for integrated assessment modelling of the climate and economy. Since then several versions have been developed by updating data and certain modules for various studies. Go back to the general introduction.

New study shows global temperature responds slowly to emissions cuts

Although large emissions cuts are urgently needed if we are to achieve the global climate goals, it may take decades before we can measure the effect of the reductions on global temperature evolution, a new study shows.

Global CO2 emissions rise again in 2018, according to latest data

Global CO2 emissions are on track to rise more than 2% in 2018 on the back of renewed growth in coal use, and continued growth in oil and gas use, according to data released on 5 December.