CICERO - Center for International Climate Research
NO
Meny
TOPICS

Phone: +47 22 00 47 45 /

E-mail: nina.schuhen@cicero.oslo.no

Nina is a statistician specializing in the use of applied statistics in the atmospheric sciences.

Nina holds a Diplom in Mathematics from Heidelberg University, Germany and a PhD in Geosciences from the University of Oslo, Norway. She has worked as a research scientist for the German national weather service DWD and the British national weather service Met Office, where she developed and implemented statistical techniques to improve numerical weather predictions and create forecast products for customers in various sectors. During her PhD on the use of short-term observations to enhance ensemble predictions on several timescales, she was employed at the Norwegian Computing Center in Oslo.

Her main interest lies in the intersection between atmospheric science and statistics and the myriad ways in which they can connect. Currently, her focus is on quantifying, illustrating and highlighting the impact of climate change on agriculture and human health.

Projects

  • HEATCOST HEATCOST will quantify health risks attributable to heat and air pollution (with a particular focus on air pollution from wildfires) in main world regions under selected climate scenarios and socioeconomic pathways. 
  • EXHAUSTION Increasing temperatures and heat waves due to climate change, combined with air pollution, constitute major health risks, and could cause an increase in cardiovascular and respiratory diseases across Europe. EXHAUSTION (Exposure to heat and air pollution in Europe – cardiopulmonary impacts and benefits of mitigation and adaptation) aims to quantify the changes in cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity due to extreme heat and air pollution (including from wildfires) under selected climate scenarios.

Publications and outreach at CICERO

Gå til: Conference lecture and academic presentation

Conference lecture and academic presentation

2021

Web articles

  • HEATCOST HEATCOST will quantify health risks attributable to heat and air pollution (with a particular focus on air pollution from wildfires) in main world regions under selected climate scenarios and socioeconomic pathways.